HEALTHCARE COST & UTILIZATION PROJECT

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HCUP Facts and Figures

TABLE OF CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS

INTRODUCTION

HCUP PARTNERS

1. OVERVIEW

2. DIAGNOSES

3. PROCEDURES

4. COSTS

5. MHSA

SOURCES/METHODS

DEFINITIONS

FOR MORE INFO

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

CITATION

FACTS & FIGURES 2008 PDF
EXHIBIT 2.1 Most Frequent Principal Diagnoses (PDF)

Number of Discharges, Percent Distribution, Rank, and Growth of the Most Frequent Principal Diagnoses for Inpatient Hospital Stays, 1997 and 2008
PRINCIPAL CCS DIAGNOSIS NUMBER OF DISCHARGES IN THOUSANDS PERCENT OF DISCHARGES RANK1 CUMULATIVE GROWTH
1997 2008 1997 2008 1997 2008 1997-2008
All discharges 34,679 39,885 100.0% 100.0% 15%
Pregnancy, childbirth, and newborn infants 8,233 9,084‡ 23.7 22.8 10
All maternal discharges* 4,338 4,667‡ 12.5 11.7 8
Trauma to vulva and perineum due to childbirth 713 820 2.1 2.1 15
Previous C-section 271 533 0.8 1.3 96
Normal pregnancy and/or delivery 544 279 1.6 0.7 -49
Hypertension complicating pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium 185 227 0.5 0.6 22
Early or threatened labor 261 212 0.8 0.5 -19
Umbilical cord complication 259 202 0.7 0.5 -22
Polyhydramnios and other problems of amniotic cavity 202 185‡ 0.6 0.5 -9
All infant discharges 3,899 4,391 11.2 11.0 13
Pneumonia 1,232 1,156 3.6 2.9 2 1 -6
Congestive heart failure 991 1,020‡ 2.9 2.6 3 2 3
Coronary atherosclerosis 1,407 919 4.1 2.3 1 3 -35
Osteoarthritis 418 911 1.2 2.3 16 4 118
Mood disorders 641 824 1.8 2.1 5 5 29
Cardiac dysrhythmias 572 798 1.7 2.0 7 6 39
Septicemia 413 791 1.2 2.0 17 7 91
Non-specific chest pain 538 727 1.6 1.8 9 8 35
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis 551 716 1.6 1.8 8 9 30
Complication of device, implant or graft 491 685 1.4 1.7 11 10 39
Acute myocardial infarction 732 645 2.1 1.6 4 11 -12
Acute cerebrovascular disease 616 565 1.8 1.4 6 14 -8
1 Rankings for principal diagnoses other than pregnancy, childbirth, or newborn infant.
— Rank not applicable.
‡ 2008 discharges are not statistically different from 1997 discharges at p‹0.05.
* Includes additional maternal CCS diagnoses not shown on this table but listed in the Sources and Methods of this report.
Source: AHRQ, Center for Delivery, Organization, and Markets, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 1997 and 2008.

 

In 2008, there were 39.9 million hospital stays, an increase of 15 percent since 1997. Trends in these stays are displayed for pregnancy, childbirth and liveborn infants, and for other frequent conditions.

Pregnancy, childbirth, and liveborn infants:

  • Conditions related to pregnancy, childbirth, and liveborn infants were the most frequent reasons for hospitalization, accounting for nearly one in four discharges (23 percent) in 2008.
  • There were 4.7 million maternal discharges in 2008. Not all of these maternal discharges involved the birth of an infant; some dealt with complications during pregnancy.
    • The most common principal diagnosis among maternal discharges was trauma to the vulva and perineum due to childbirth, which increased 15 percent between 1997 and 2008.
    • Normal pregnancy and delivery stays declined by 49 percent and stays with a principal diagnosis of umbilical cord complications declined by 22 percent from 1997 to 2008.
    • In contrast, principal diagnosis of previous C-section nearly doubled (up 96 percent) during this period.
    • Stays with a principal diagnosis of high blood pressure during pregnancy increased by 22 percent between 1997 and 2008.
  • There were 4.4 million infant discharges in 2008, a 13-percent increase since 1997.

CCS principal diagnoses:

  • The 10 most frequent principal diagnoses outside of pregnancy, childbirth and liveborn infants accounted for about one-quarter of all discharges in 2008.
    • Pneumonia (2.9 percent of all discharges) and congestive heart failure (2.6 percent) were the most common reasons for hospitalization.
    • The fourth and seventh most frequent principal diagnoses in 2008 (osteoarthritis and septicemia) were not among the most frequent diagnoses in 1997. Between 1997 and 2008, stays for osteoarthritis increased 118 percent and stays for septicemia increased by 91 percent.
    • Mood disorders was ranked fifth in 1997 and 2008, but increased nearly 30 percent over this time period.
    • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was the ninth ranked condition in 2008 and increased 30 percent since 1997.
    • Complication of device, implant or graft increased 39 percent from 1997 to 2008 and was the tenth ranked condition in 2008.
  • Four circulatory diseasesócongestive heart failure, coronary artery disease, non-specific chest pain, and irregular heartbeatówere among the top ten most frequent principal diagnoses in 2008.
    • Stays for irregular heart beat increased 39 percent between 1997 and 2008 and stays for non-specific chest pain grew 35 percent. Stays for coronary artery disease declined 35 percent. Stays for congestive heart failure changed very little from 1997 to 2008.
  • Two conditions were among the top ten conditions in 1997, but were not in 2008.
    • Hospital stays for acute myocardial infarction declined 12 percent. This condition ranked fourth in 1997, but dropped to eleventh by 2008.
    • Acute cerebrovascular disease ranked sixth in 1997 and declined 8 percent to rank fourteenth in 2008.

Internet Citation: Facts and Figures 2008. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP). October 2010. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/reports/factsandfigures/2008/exhibit2_1.jsp.
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Last modified 10/7/10